AN INNER DIALOGUE

Title, An Inner Dialogue Grisha Bruskin, Courtesy of the Artist
Grisha Bruskin, Courtesy of the Artist

Olga Sviblova director of the Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow (MAMM) established the museum under the patronage of Evgeny Rodchenko as the House of Photography shortly following the collapse of the USSR.

Sviblova— It [is] very important that Russian Nonconformist art become the future symbol of all that’s new in Russian contemporary art from the time it was unofficial to through to it’s legalization at the end of the 80s. This culture existed for the artists themselves and for their friends, and they didn’t want to subject themselves to Soviet censorship.

(Left) Grisha Bruskin, Group Exhibition of Nonconformist Artists
(Left) Grisha Bruskin, Group Exhibition of Nonconformist Artists
Courtesy of the Artist
Sculpture

Orlov— Well, when I came to his studio, I understood at once that definitely I would be friends with this man for a long time. I looked at what he was doing, and after that we were sitting drinking tea for many long hours. It turned out that we had absolutely similar opinions about many things: in our views on the general situation, on Russian art, in our attitude towards all those officious things of that time.

Gathering of Artists, Courtesy of the Artist
Gathering of Artists, Courtesy of the Artist

Sviblova— And this simmering incredibly intense cultural space hidden from the public gaze and officialdom lived on in an inner dialogue.

This inner dialogue expresses itself in many forms of media including literature. Publisher Irina Prokharova began her publishing house, The New Literary Observer, in 1992. She tries to “change the image of the country” with Russian Nonconformism.

Prokharova— People know of horror stories about mafia, oligarchs, corruption, bureacracy, old stereotypes about the mystical Russian soul, but the most interesting and striking thing in the Soviet experience is this parallel culture that had its readers and buyers with a sophisticated and secretive system of dissemination of knowledge, and in my opinion, it is this unique experience that is not yet described and widely understood.

Sketch of group of people

Prokharova— I think that for understanding how the Soviet society gradually matured and could finally destroy the rigidity of the Soviet existence, it is important to understand that resistance to the Soviet system would most often pass not through political resistance, but through an attempt to expand private space.

Grisha Bruskin, Life Over All, Courtesy of the Artist
Grisha Bruskin, Life Over All, Courtesy of the Artist

The company published four books written by Grisha Bruskin and now also publishes The Emergency Ration and The Journal of Dress, Body, and Culture.

Prokharova— What I find interesting about Bruskin’s work is first, it is very striking prose, and secondly the phenomenon that Nonconformist art set the foundation for modern literature. But unfortunately this is not widely known abroad or even in Russia.

Black Demon artwork by Grisha Bruskin

Archival worked with Grisha Bruskin at CDM Studios in New York to record some of his published memoirs to develop into the script for The Frozen Theater. The script also includes a few works from writers that have inspired the artist such as Anna Akhmatova and Rainer Maria Rilke.

 
Russian Nonconformist art became the future symbol of all that’s new
-Olga Sviblova
 
I would be friends with this man for a long time.
-Boris Orlov
 
This parallel culture... is not yet described and widely understood.
-Irina Prokharova
 

Home   |   Previous   |   Next